humanoidhistory:

Moon man Neil Armstrong makes an impression at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, 2007.

humanoidhistory:

Moon man Neil Armstrong makes an impression at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, 2007.

sagansense:

"Americans always expected their children to face a brighter economic future, and we scientists expected our students to inherit a world where science was embraced by an ever-larger fraction of the population. This never implied turning science into a religion or demanding slavish acceptance of this year’s hot research trends. We face many daunting challenges as a society, and they won’t all be solved with more science and math education. But what has been lost is an understanding that science’s open-ended, evidence-based processes — rather than just its results — are essential to meeting those challenges.

My professors’ generation could respond to silliness like creationism with head-scratching bemusement. My students cannot afford that luxury. Instead they must become fierce champions of science in the marketplace of ideas.

During my undergraduate studies I was shocked at the low opinion some of my professors had of the astronomer Carl Sagan. For me his efforts to popularize science were an inspiration, but for them such “outreach” was a diversion. That view makes no sense today.

The enthusiasm and generous spirit that Mr. Sagan used to advocate for science now must inspire all of us. There are science Twitter feeds and blogs to run, citywide science festivals and high school science fairs that need input. For the civic-minded nonscientists there are school board curriculum meetings and long-term climate response plans that cry out for the participation of informed citizens. And for every parent and grandparent there is the opportunity to make a few more trips to the science museum with your children.

Behind the giant particle accelerators and space observatories, science is a way of behaving in the world. It is, simply put, a tradition. And as we know from history’s darkest moments, even the most enlightened traditions can be broken and lost. Perhaps that is the most important lesson all lifelong students of science must learn now.”

Adam Frank, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Rochester, is the author of “About Time: Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang” and a founder of NPR’s 13.7 Cosmos and Culture blog.

From the NY Times article “Welcome to the Age of Denial”

cracked:

Luis Prada remembers dressing like that. And you know what? He misses it.
4 Uncool Fashion Trends We Should Give a Second Chance

#4. Fanny Packs
I had a fanny pack when I was a kid. I got rid of it when I entered middle school, which is around the age when kids start asking questions like “Is that where you keep your vagina?” The biggest reason for that, I think, is that fanny packs are too practical for their own good. They’re so functional, they practically sell themselves, but they’re also so tragically uncool that they practically recall themselves back to the factory and their Asian sweatshop manufacturers commit seppuku for shaming the world with the uncoolness of their functionally perfect product.

Read More

cracked:

Luis Prada remembers dressing like that. And you know what? He misses it.

4 Uncool Fashion Trends We Should Give a Second Chance

#4. Fanny Packs

I had a fanny pack when I was a kid. I got rid of it when I entered middle school, which is around the age when kids start asking questions like “Is that where you keep your vagina?” The biggest reason for that, I think, is that fanny packs are too practical for their own good. They’re so functional, they practically sell themselves, but they’re also so tragically uncool that they practically recall themselves back to the factory and their Asian sweatshop manufacturers commit seppuku for shaming the world with the uncoolness of their functionally perfect product.

Read More

centuriespast:

PRUD’HON, Pierre-PaulInnocence Preferring Love to Wealth1804Oil on canvas, 243 x 194 cmThe Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Kinda looks like Cupid has a mustache

centuriespast:

PRUD’HON, Pierre-Paul
Innocence Preferring Love to Wealth
1804
Oil on canvas, 243 x 194 cm
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Kinda looks like Cupid has a mustache

art-centric:

James Abbott McNeill Whistler -Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea

art-centric:

James Abbott McNeill Whistler -Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea

(via art--gallery)

climateadaptation:

rhamphotheca:

Glacier National Park - MT, USA
This White-tailed Ptarmigan was spotted with her four chicks up at Logan Pass yesterday. She is part of a research study to determine changes in habitat location and breeding numbers. 
White-tailed ptarmigans are well-adapted to high elevations and cool temperatures. Rising temperatures (3x the global average rise in temperature) at high elevations over the last century means change for this alpine specialist. 
According to researcher David Benson, data from the ptarmigan study shows that “white-tailed ptarmigan in Glacier have changed distribution, altered habitat preferences, and perhaps on a local scale, experienced declining population numbers in late summer.” (ms)

What a beeeeautiful bird! Lives in Montana. Of course, endangered because humans.

climateadaptation:

rhamphotheca:

This White-tailed Ptarmigan was spotted with her four chicks up at Logan Pass yesterday. She is part of a research study to determine changes in habitat location and breeding numbers.

White-tailed ptarmigans are well-adapted to high elevations and cool temperatures. Rising temperatures (3x the global average rise in temperature) at high elevations over the last century means change for this alpine specialist.

According to researcher David Benson, data from the ptarmigan study shows that “white-tailed ptarmigan in Glacier have changed distribution, altered habitat preferences, and perhaps on a local scale, experienced declining population numbers in late summer.” (ms)

What a beeeeautiful bird! Lives in Montana. Of course, endangered because humans.

humanoidhistory:

The space shuttle prototype Enterprise separates from its 747 jumbo jet mothership in the air above the Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, 1977. (NASA Dryden)

humanoidhistory:

The space shuttle prototype Enterprise separates from its 747 jumbo jet mothership in the air above the Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, California, 1977. (NASA Dryden)

solar-aestheticss:

Josef Váchal

I love the sun in this painting

solar-aestheticss:

Josef Váchal

I love the sun in this painting

(via achillesaesthetic)

child-of-thecosmos:

Fiery Looping Rain on the Sun [Full HQ video]

Eruptive events on the sun can be wildly different. Some come just with a solar flare, some with an additional ejection of solar material called a coronal mass ejection (CME), and some with complex moving structures in association with changes in magnetic field lines that loop up into the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.

On July 19, 2012, an eruption occurred on the sun that produced all three. A moderately powerful solar flare exploded on the sun’s lower right hand limb, sending out light and radiation. Next came a CME, which shot off to the right out into space. And then, the sun treated viewers to one of its dazzling magnetic displays — a phenomenon known as coronal rain.

(via afro-dominicano)